How Will I Pay for My Family’s Vaccinations?

By answering a couple of questions, Vaccinate Your Family can help you figure out how to pay for vaccinations for yourself and your family members. Click the “START” button below.

Paying for COVID-19 Vaccines

COVID-19 vaccine doses will be given for free to people living in the U.S.  regardless of their immigration or health insurance status. For more information and for other questions about the COVID-19 vaccine, visit our Q&A page for COVID-19 vaccines.

 

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    Question 1Who in your family needs to be vaccinated?

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      Question 2Do you or your child have:

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      Question 2Do you or your child have:

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      Question 2Do you or another adult in your family, who are between 19 and 64 years old, have:

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      Question 2Are you or someone else in your family currently pregnant and:

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        Question 3Do you have:

Pregnant Woman Younger than 19 Years Old with Private Health Insurance

Pregnant women need the flu and Tdap vaccines during every pregnancy to protect both mom and baby from serious illness and health complications. Learn more.

By law, private health insurance companies are required to cover all of CDC’s recommended vaccines at no cost“No cost” means that you should not have to pay an office copay, coinsurance or meet a deductible in order for you to get the recommended vaccines. However, vaccines are usually only “no cost” when given by a doctor or other provider in your health plan’s network. when given by a participating healthcare provider in your health plan. But, in some rare instances, the flu or Tdap vaccine for pregnant women may not be covered by your health plan. If you are unsure if the flu and Tdap vaccinations will be covered for pregnant women, contact your health insurance company, and ask if the vaccines will be covered at no cost“No cost” means that you should not have to pay an office copay, coinsurance or meet a deductible in order for you to get the recommended vaccines. However, vaccines are usually only “no cost” when given by a doctor or other provider in your health plan’s network. for pregnant individuals under 19 years old and if there are any other fees for the vaccine visits.

Vaccines for Children (VFC) Program

If your private health insurance does not cover the flu and/or Tdap vaccine, you may qualify as “underinsured” for the federal Vaccines for Children (VFC) program. “Underinsured” individuals 18 years old and younger who are eligible for free vaccines through the VFC program, must get them at a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) or Rural Health Clinic (RHC). (Clinics may require you to register as a patient in order to get free vaccines from the VFC program.)

While the recommended vaccines given by a VFC provider are free for underinsured people when given at a FQHC or RHC, your provider may charge other costs for the visit. For example:

  • A fee to give each shot (However, they cannot refuse to vaccinate you if you are unable to pay these fees.)
  • A fee (copay) for the office visit
  • A fee for non-vaccine services, like an blood test

Click here to find a FQHC or here to find a RHC near you, or contact your state or local health department. You can also call CDC at 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636) for help in English or Spanish.

How can I find more information about VFC?

To confirm that you are eligible for free flu and Tdap vaccines through the VFC program or for any other vaccine-related questions, contact your state or local health department.

Click here to view and download a handout about the federal Vaccines for Children program.

What if I can’t afford a vaccine that I need?

If you have any problems getting both the flu and Tdap vaccine paid for through the Vaccines for Children Program, contact your state or local health department to ask if they know of any programs that offer free or low cost vaccines for pregnant women. You may also be able to get lower cost vaccines at your local health department, FQHC, RHC

Pregnant Woman Younger than 19 Years Old with CHIP (Children’s Health Insurance Program)

Pregnant individuals are recommended to get the flu and Tdap vaccines during every pregnancy to protect both mom and baby from serious illness and health complications. Learn more.

If you are enrolled in your state’s CHIP planCHIP is a joint federal-state program run by each state that provides health insurance to those 18 years old and younger whose parents can't afford private health insurance, but don’t qualify for Medicaid., all of CDC’s recommended vaccines should be free. However, you should contact your state CHIP plan directly to confirm that both the flu vaccine and Tdap vaccine are covered for pregnant individuals under 19 years old, and to find out whether there are any other fees for your vaccine visits.

While the vaccines should be free when given by a healthcare provider or clinic in your state CHIP plan’s provider network, your provider may charge other costs for the visit. For example:

  • A fee to give each shot (known as a vaccine administration fee)
  • A fee (copay) for the office visit
  • A fee for non-vaccine services, like a blood test

How Can I Find More Information about CHIP and My State’s CHIP Plan?

Visit InsureKidsNow.gov or call 1-877-KIDS-NOW (1-877-543-7669) to be connected to your state’s CHIP Plan. You can also contact your state’s Medicaid agency to find a healthcare provider who sees CHIP patients.

Click here for answers to other common CHIP questions.

What if I can’t afford a vaccine that I need?

If you have any problems getting both the flu and Tdap vaccines covered through your state’s CHIP plan, you may have some other options.

Pregnant Woman Younger than 19 Years Old on Medicaid

The CDC and medical experts recommend that all pregnant women get the flu and Tdap vaccines during every pregnancy to protect both mom and baby from serious illness and health complications. Learn more.

If you are younger than 19 years old and on Medicaid, you qualify for the federal Vaccines for Children (VFC) program, which provides free CDC-recommended vaccines. To get free vaccines through the VFC program, they must be given by a participating VFC provider.

Where can I get vaccinated?

Ask your current healthcare provider if they participate in the VFC program.

If not, there are many other providers that participate in the VFC program, including pediatricians, family physicians, local health departments, Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs), Rural Health Clinics (RHCs), pharmacies, urgent care clinics, and school-based clinics. (Clinics may require you to register as a patient.)

Contact your state or local health department to find a VFC provider, or click here to find a FQHC or here to find a RHC near you. You can also call CDC at 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636) for help in English and Spanish.

How much will the vaccine visit cost?

While there should be no charge for the vaccines given by a VFC provider, they may charge other costs for the visit. For example:

  • A fee to give each shot (However, they cannot refuse to vaccinate you if you are unable to pay these fees.)
  • A fee (copay) for the office visit
  • A fee for non-vaccine services, like an eye exam or blood test

Where can I find more information about VFC?

To confirm that you are eligible for free flu and Tdap vaccines through the VFC program or for any other vaccine-related questions, contact your state or local health department.

Click here to view and print a handout about the federal Vaccines for Children program.

What if I can’t afford a vaccine that I need?

If you have any problems getting both the flu and Tdap vaccines paid for through the Vaccines for Children (VFC) program, you may have some other options.

Pregnant Woman Younger than 19 Years Old with No Health Insurance (Uninsured)

The CDC and medical experts recommend that all pregnant women get the flu and Tdap vaccines during every pregnancy to protect both mom and baby from serious illness and health complications. Learn more.

If you are younger than 19 years old and don’t have health insurance, you qualify for the federal Vaccines for Children (VFC) program, which provides free CDC-recommended vaccines to eligible people. To get free vaccines through the VFC program, they must be given by a participating VFC provider.

Where can I get vaccinated?

Ask your current healthcare provider if they participate in the VFC program.

If they don’t, there are many other providers that participate in the VFC program, including pediatricians, family physicians, local health departments, Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs), Rural Health Clinics (RHCs), pharmacies, urgent care clinics, and school-based clinics. (Clinics may require you to register as a patient.)

Contact your state or local health department to find a VFC provider, or click here to find a FQHC or here to find a RHC near you. You can also call CDC at 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636) for help in English and Spanish.

How much will the vaccine visit cost?

While there should be no charge for the vaccines given by a VFC provider, they may charge other costs for the visit. For example:

  • A fee to give each shot (However, they cannot refuse to vaccinate you if you are unable to pay these fees.)
  • A fee (copay) for the office visit
  • A fee for non-vaccine services, like an eye exam or blood test

Where can I find more information about VFC?

To confirm that you are eligible for free flu and Tdap vaccines through the VFC program or for any other vaccine-related questions, contact your state or local health department.

Click here to view and print out a flyer about the federal Vaccines for Children program.

What if I can’t afford a vaccine that I need?

If you have any problems getting both the flu and Tdap vaccines paid for through the Vaccines for Children program, you may have some other options.

Child 18 Years Old or Younger with Private Health Insurance

By law, private health insurance companies are required to cover CDC’s routinely recommended vaccines for children and teens – at no cost“No cost” means that you should not have to pay an office copay, coinsurance or meet a deductible for your child to get their recommended vaccinations. However, vaccines are usually only “no cost” when given by a doctor or other provider in your health insurance’s network.

In some rare instances, a child’s vaccinations may not be covered by your health plan. If you are unsure if your child’s vaccinations will be paid for, contact your health insurance company, and ask if they cover all of CDC’s routinely recommended vaccines for children at no cost“No cost” means that you should not have to pay an office copay, coinsurance or meet a deductible in order for your child to get their recommended vaccinations..

Vaccines for Children (VFC) Program

If your health insurance does not cover one or more of the CDC-recommended vaccines for your child, they may qualify as “underinsured” for the federal Vaccines for Children (VFC) program.  Underinsured children who are eligible for VFC must get their free vaccines from a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) or Rural Health Clinic (RHC). (Clinics may require your child to register as a patient in order to get free vaccines.)

While CDC’s recommended vaccines given by a VFC provider at FQHCs or RHCs are free, your doctor may charge other costs for the visit. For example:

  • A fee to give each shot (However, they cannot refuse to vaccinate your child if you are unable to pay these fees.)
  • A fee (copay) for the office visit
  • A fee for non-vaccine services, like an eye exam or blood test

How can I find more information?

To confirm that your child is eligible for VFC or for any other questions, contact your state or local health department.

Click here to view and print a handout about the federal Vaccines for Children program.

Click here to find a FQHC or here to find a RHC near you, or call CDC at 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636) for help in English and Spanish.

Child 18 Years Old or Younger on CHIP (Children’s Health Insurance Program) Plan

If your child is enrolled in your state’s CHIP planCHIP is a joint federal-state program run by each state that provides health insurance to those 18 years old and younger whose parents can't afford private health insurance, but don’t qualify for Medicaid., all of CDC’s routinely recommended childhood vaccines should be free. However, these vaccines are usually only free when given by a healthcare provider or clinic in your state CHIP plan’s provider network.

Your provider may charge other costs for the visit. For example:

  • A fee to give each shot
  • A fee (copay) for the office visit
  • A fee for non-vaccine services, like an eye exam or blood test

Need more information about CHIP?

Visit InsureKidsNow.gov or call 1-877-KIDS-NOW (1-877-543-7669) to be connected to your state’s CHIP plan or contact your state’s Medicaid agency to find a healthcare provider who sees CHIP patients. Click here for answers to other common CHIP questions.

Child 18 Years Old or Younger on Medicaid

If your child is on MedicaidYour state Medicaid program might be run by a managed care organization (MCO) or other health plan., they qualify for the federal Vaccines for Children (VFC) program, which provides free vaccines to children 18 years old and younger. In order to get free vaccines through VFC, they must be given by a participating VFC provider.

Where can I get my child vaccinated?

Ask your child’s healthcare provider if they participate in the VFC program, which includes many pediatricians, family physicians, local health departments, Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs), Rural Health Clinics (RHCs), pharmacies, urgent care clinics, and school-based clinics. (Clinics may require your child to register as a patient to give them vaccines.)

If your child’s healthcare provider does not participate in the VFC program, contact your state or local health department, or click here to find a FQHC or here to find a RHC near you. You can also call CDC at 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636) for help in English and Spanish.

How much will the vaccine visit cost?

While there is no charge for the vaccines given by a VFC provider, they may charge other costs for the visit. For example:

  • A fee to give each shot (However, they cannot refuse to vaccinate your child if you are unable to pay these fees.)
  • A fee (copay) for the office visit
  • A fee for non-vaccine services, like an eye exam or blood test

Where can I find out more information about VFC?

To find out more about VFC, ask your child’s healthcare provider or contact your state or local health department.

Click here to view and print a handout about the federal Vaccines for Children program.

Questions about Medicaid?

Visit InsureKidsNow.gov or call 1-877-KIDS-NOW (1-877-543-7669) to find answers to common questions about Medicaid and CHIP. You can also contact your state Medicaid agency.

Child with No Insurance (Uninsured)

If your child does not have health insurance, they qualify for the federal Vaccines for Children (VFC) program, which provides free vaccines to children 18 years old and younger when given by a participating VFC provider.

Where can I get my child vaccinated?

Ask your child’s healthcare provider if they participate in the VFC program, which includes many pediatricians, family physicians, local health departments, Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs), Rural Health Clinics (RHCs), pharmacies, urgent care clinics, and school-based clinics. (Clinics may require your child to register as a patient to give them vaccines.)

If your child’s healthcare provider does not participate in the VFC program, contact your state or local health department, or click here to find a FQHC or here to find a RHC near you. You can also call CDC at 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636) for help in English and Spanish.

How much will the vaccine visit cost?

While there is no charge for the vaccines given by a VFC provider, your healthcare provider may charge other costs for the visit. For example:

  • A fee to give each shot (However, they cannot refuse to vaccinate your child if you are unable to pay these fees.)
  • A fee (copay) for the office visit
  • A fee for a non-vaccine service like a blood test or vision test

Where can I find out more information about VFC?

To find out more about VFC, ask your child’s healthcare provider or contact your state or local health department.

Click here to view and print a flyer about the federal VFC program.

How can I get my child health insurance?

If your child does not have health insurance, you can see if they qualify for free or low-cost health insurance through either CHIP or Medicaid by clicking here. You can also find answers to common questions about CHIP and Medicaid health coverage at InsureKidsNow.gov or call 1-877-KIDS-NOW (1-877-543-7669).

Adult 19-64 Years Old with Private Health Insurance

By law, private health insurance companies are required to cover preventive care services including CDC’s routinely recommended vaccines for adults at no cost“No cost” means that you should not have to pay an office copay, coinsurance or meet a deductible to get your vaccinations. However, vaccines are usually only “no cost” when given by a doctor or other provider in your health insurance’s network. Contact your insurance company to ask where your vaccines are covered at no cost – either at a doctor’s office or at a specific pharmacy.

In some instances, your vaccines – like travel vaccines – might not be paid for by your health plan. If you are unsure if the vaccines you need will be covered, call your insurance company first and ask if there will be any cost, such as an office copay or a vaccine administration fee, or if you need to meet a deductible before they will pay for vaccines. Also ask them if the vaccines must be given by a certain doctor, pharmacist, or other healthcare provider to be covered.

What If I Can’t Afford My Vaccines?

If you can’t afford your vaccines, you may be able to get them at a lower cost at a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC), Rural Health Clinic (RHC) or local health department. (Clinics may require you to register as a patient in order to give you vaccines.) 

You can also contact your state or local health department or call CDC at 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636) for help in English and Spanish.

Adult on Medicaid

Most state Medicaid plansYour state Medicaid plan might be run by a managed care organization (MCO) or other health plan. cover at least some adult vaccinations, but some may not offer all CDC-recommended vaccines for free.

Contact your state Medicaid agency to find out whether the vaccine(s) you need will be free and whether you might have to also pay a copay, coinsurance or vaccine administration fee (i.e., fee for each shot given). Also ask them if the vaccines must be given by a certain doctor, pharmacist, or other healthcare provider to be covered.

If you are under 21 years old, you may be eligible for Medicaid’s Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic and Treatment (EPSDT) Benefit, which provides comprehensive and preventive healthcare services, including free CDC-recommended vaccinations, for people under 21 years old.

What If I can’t afford the vaccines I need?

If you can’t afford one or more vaccines, you might be able to get them at a lower cost at a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC)Rural Health Clinic (RHC) or your local health department. (Clinics may require you to register as a patient in order to give you vaccines.)

For questions, you can contact your state or local health department or call 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636) for help in English and Spanish.

Adult on Medicare

Medicare covers vaccines under Part B (medical insurance) and Part D (prescription drug plans).

  • Medicare Part B covers flu and pneumococcal vaccines at no cost“No cost” means that you should not have to pay an office copay, coinsurance or meet a deductible in order for you to get flu or pneumococcal vaccinations. However, vaccines are usually only “no cost” when given by a doctor or other provider in your Medicare network.
  • Medicare Part D may cover other vaccines such as shingles, Tdap (whooping cough), MMR, and more.

For questions about which vaccines are free and if there are any other fees you may have to pay during your vaccine visit, visit Medicare.gov or call 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227).

Medicare Advantage Plans and Medicare Part D Plans

If you have a Medicare Advantage PlanYour state Medicare Advantage Plan might be run by a managed care organization (MCO) or other health plan(that provides all your Part A and Part B Medicare benefits) OR a Medicare Part D Plan (that adds prescription drug coverage), contact your plan first to find out how they pay for CDC-recommended adult vaccines.

Make sure to ask:

  • If there are any fees for the vaccine itself or for vaccine administration
  • If there are any fees for the office visit, such as a copay
  • If you need to meet your plan’s deductible before your vaccines will be covered
  • If you need to go to a specific healthcare provider in your Plan’s network in order for the vaccines to be covered by your plan

What if I can’t afford the vaccines I need?

If you can’t afford the cost of a particular vaccine, you may be able to get it at a lower cost at a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC)Rural Health Clinic (RHC) or your local health department. (Clinics may require you to register as a patient in order to give you vaccines.)

For help, contact your state or local health department or call CDC at 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636) in English and Spanish.

Adult with No Health Insurance (Uninsured)

If you do not have health insurance, you will have probably have to pay the full cost of the vaccines and any related fees, such as an office copay, coinsurance and/or a vaccine administration fee (i.e., fee to give each shot) at a doctor’s office, health clinic or pharmacy.

What if I Can’t Afford the Vaccines?

If you can’t afford the vaccines you need, you can contact your state or local health department and ask if they know of any state programs that offer free or lower cost adult vaccinations. You may also contact a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) or Rural Health Clinic (RHC) in your area to see if they offer vaccines for adults at a lower cost, or call CDC at 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636) for help in English and Spanish. (Clinics may require you to register as a patient in order to give you vaccines.)

Adult 65 Years Old or Older on Medicare

Adults 65 years of age and older in the U.S. are eligible for Medicare. If you have not signed up for Medicare, you can get started here.

Medicare pays for vaccines under Part B (medical insurance) and Part D (prescription drug plans).

  • Medicare Part B covers flu and pneumococcal vaccines at no cost.“No cost” means that you should not have to pay an office copay, coinsurance or meet a deductible in order for you to get flu or pneumococcal vaccinations. However, vaccines are usually only “no cost” when given by a doctor or other provider in your Medicare network.
  • Medicare Part D may cover other vaccines such as shingles, Tdap (whooping cough), MMR, and more.

For questions about which vaccines are free and if there are any other fees you may have to pay during your vaccine visit, visit Medicare.gov or call 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227).

Medicare Advantage Plans and Medicare Part D Plans

If you have a Medicare Advantage PlanYour state Medicare Advantage Plan might be run by a managed care organization (MCO) or other health plan(that provides all your Part A and Part B Medicare benefits) OR a Medicare Part D Plan (that adds prescription drug coverage), contact your plan first to find out how they pay for CDC-recommended adult vaccines.

Make sure to ask:

  • If there are any fees for the vaccine or for vaccine administration
  • If there are any fees for the office visit, such as a copay
  • If you need to meet your plan’s deductible before your vaccines will be covered
  • If you need to go to a specific healthcare provider in your Plan’s network in order for the vaccines to be covered by your plan

What if I can’t afford a vaccine that I need?

If you can’t afford the cost of a particular vaccine, you may be able to get it at a lower cost at a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC)Rural Health Clinic (RHC) or your local health department. (Clinics may require you to register as a patient in order to give you vaccines.)

For help, contact your state or local health department or call CDC at 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636) in English and Spanish.

Pregnant Woman with Private Health Insurance

Pregnant women are recommended to get a Tdap and flu vaccine during every pregnancy to protect both mom and baby from serious illness. Learn more.

Private health insurance companies are required by law to cover preventive services including CDC’s recommended vaccines for pregnant women at no cost“No cost” means that you should not have to pay an office copay, coinsurance or meet a deductible in order to get your vaccinations. However, vaccines are usually only “no cost” when given by a doctor or other provider in your health insurance’s network..

Speak to your prenatal care provider about giving you the recommended vaccines or speak to your general healthcare provider.

In some rare instances, private health plans may not cover Tdap and flu vaccinations for pregnant women. If you are unsure if your vaccines will be covered, call your health insurance company, and ask them whether the Tdap and flu vaccines are covered at no cost“No cost” means that you should not have to pay an office copay, coinsurance or meet a deductible in order to get your vaccinations. However, vaccines are usually only free when given by a doctor or other provider in your health insurance’s network. during pregnancy and if there are any other fees you will need to pay when you get vaccinated.

What if I can’t afford a vaccine that I need?

If you have any problems getting both the flu and Tdap vaccines paid for through your private health insurance:

Pregnant Woman on Medicaid

Pregnant women are recommended to get a Tdap vaccine and a flu shot during every pregnancy to protect both mom and baby from serious illness. Learn more.

The flu and Tdap vaccines may be free for pregnant women on MedicaidYour state Medicaid plan might be run by a managed care organization (MCO) or other health plan., but it depends on the state you live in. In addition, you might be asked to pay an office copay and/or a vaccine administration fee. To find out, ask your healthcare provider or contact your state’s Medicaid office.

If you are under 21 years old, you may be eligible for Medicaid’s Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic and Treatment (EPSDT) Benefit, which provides preventive healthcare services, including CDC-recommended vaccinations for people under age 21.

What if my Medicaid Plan doesn’t pay for the vaccines and I can’t afford them?

If your Medicaid plan does not cover  flu and Tdap vaccines for pregnant women (during every pregnancy) and you can’t afford them, you may be able to get the vaccines at a lower cost at a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC), Rural Health Clinic (RHC) or your local health department. (Clinics may require you to register as a patient to get vaccines.)

Questions?

For questions, you can contact your state or local health department or call CDC at 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636) for help in English and Spanish.

Pregnant Woman with No Health Insurance (Uninsured)

Pregnant women are recommended to get a Tdap vaccine and a flu shot during every pregnancy to protect both mom and baby from serious illness.

If you are pregnant and don’t have health insurance, you should find out if you are eligible for your state’s Medicaid plan by contacting your state’s Medicaid office.

The flu and Tdap vaccines may be free for pregnant women on Medicaid, but it depends on the state you live in. In addition, your healthcare provider may charge other costs for the visit. For example:

    • A fee to give each vaccine
    • A fee (copay) for the office visit
    • A fee for non-vaccine related services

For more information about vaccines covered under your Medicaid plan, ask your healthcare provider or contact your state’s Medicaid office.

If you are under 21 years old, you may be eligible for Medicaid’s Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic and Treatment (EPSDT) Benefit, which provides preventive healthcare services, including free CDC-recommended vaccinations for people under 21 years old.

What If I am Not Eligible for Medicaid or Medicaid’s EPSDT Benefit?

If you are not eligible for Medicaid, you may have to pay the full cost of the vaccines and any related fees, such as an office copay or an administration fee for each vaccine.

What If I Can’t Afford the Vaccines?

If you can’t afford the vaccines, you can contact your state or local health department to ask if they know of any state programs that offer free or low-cost vaccines for pregnant women. You may also contact a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC), Rural Health Clinic (RHC) or local health department in your area to see if they offer vaccines for pregnant women at a lower cost. (Clinics may require you to register as a patient to give you vaccines.)

Pregnant Woman Younger than 19 Years Old with No Health Insurance (Uninsured)

If you are pregnant, younger than 19 years old and don’t have health insurance, you qualify for the federal Vaccines for Children (VFC) program, which provides free routinely recommended childhood vaccines, when given by a participating VFC provider.

In addition to all of the childhood recommended vaccines, pregnant women are recommended to get a Tdap vaccine and a flu shot during every pregnancy to protect both mom and baby from serious illness.

Where can I get vaccinated?

Ask your current healthcare provider if they participate in the VFC program.

If not,  there are many other VFC providers including pediatricians, family physicians, local health departments, Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs), Rural Health Clinics (RHCs), pharmacies, urgent care clinics, and school-based clinics. (Clinics may require you to register as a patient to give you vaccines.)

For help finding a healthcare provider or for questions, contact your state or local health department. Click here to find a FQHC or here to find a RHC near you. You can also call 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636) for help in English and Spanish.

How much will the vaccine visit cost?

While there is no charge for the vaccines given by a VFC provider, your healthcare provider may charge other costs for the visit. For example:

  • A fee to give each shot (However, they cannot refuse to vaccinate you are unable to pay these fees.)
  • A fee (copay) for the office visit
  • A fee for a non-vaccine service like a blood test

Where can I find out more information about VFC?

To find out more about VFC, ask your healthcare provider or contact your state or local health department.

Click here to view and print a handout about the federal Vaccines for Children program.

What if I can’t afford a vaccine that I need?

If you have any problems getting both the flu and Tdap vaccines paid for through the Vaccines for Children program, you may have some other options.

How can I get health insurance?

You might qualify for free or low-cost health insurance through either CHIP or Medicaid. Learn more by clicking here. You can also find answers to common questions about CHIP and Medicaid health coverage at InsureKidsNow.gov or call 1-877-KIDS-NOW (1-877-543-7669).

Member or Dependent of the U.S. Military

If you serve in the military or if you or your child is a military dependent, you are eligible for TRICARE. Under TRICARE, CDC’s routinely recommended vaccines should be fully covered at no cost. Thank you for your service!